Thursday, November 20, 2014

10 CON VẬT DƯỚI NI, COI BỘ HIỀN LÀNH ZỄ THƯƠNG NHƯNG VÔ CÙNG NGUY HIỄM !!



10 CON VẬT DƯỚI NI, COI BỘ HIỀN LÀNH ZỄ THƯƠNG NHƯNG VÔ CÙNG NGUY HIỄM !!


10 Cute and Deadly Animals.

We all know that some animals are extremely dangerous to humans and we all know we should stay away from them. Spiders, snakes, big cats, bears and other such creatures are all examples of things we should all be afraid of. And yet some of nature's cutest, most lovely creatures can also be quite deadly.
Platypus:

cute and deadly


This was a really big shock for me, this animal that appears to be so harmless and awkward, is in fact venomous. The male platypus' ankle spurs produce a venom that's powerful enough to kill smaller animals such as dogs. The venom is not lethal to humans but the pain is so excruciating and powerful that the victim might become incapacitated. The 15 mm (about half an inch) long hollow spurs are placed along the inside of the rear legs, so the platypus can even deliver a paralyzing kick when it's on the run.
Swan:
cute and deadly


The exact opposite of the platypus, swans are the living symbol of grace and beauty. They are not only relatively gentle creatures in nature, but are also well known for being animals that mate with a single partner for their whole life. The fact that swans are so loyal and loving is part of the problem. When other creatures or their young ones are threatened or attacked, they will eventually give up if the predator is too strong, however, swans do not give up. If provoked, swans will bite you and hit you without hesitation and without letting go. Swans can be so scary that in Ireland, it is not uncommon for rowing teams to cancel practice because there is a swan in the river.
Dingo:

cute and deadly


These Australian wild dogs are actually classified as a subspecies of the grey wolf and while they may look like dogs, their nature is far more dangerous. What's even worse is that the features that they do share with dogs, make them even more deadly. They are inquisitive, intelligent predators and they travel in packs. If you see a dingo while traveling about in the Australian outback, don’t go too close to it and don’t even think about petting it.

Poison Dart Frog:

cute and deadly


It's right there in the name - these little guys are full of poison. The most poisonous of these frogs, the golden poison frog, has enough toxin to kill ten to twenty men. But what really makes these cute, tiny frogs, even more deadly is that they don’t have to bite you to deliver their venom. The poison can be secreted through the fogs skin, meaning that if you even touch one of these you might be in great danger. This is a classic example of the fact that many of the vibrant colors we see in the animal kingdom are really a warning sign.  
Wolverine:
cute and deadly


Armed with powerful jaws, sharp claws and a thick hide, the wolverine is one little ball of fur you don't want to mess with. The wolverine  is the largest land-dwelling species of the weasels family, but thanks to its stocky and muscular body it looks more like a small bear. The adult wolverine is about the size of a medium dog but has a well known and documented reputation for taking down prey as large as a moose and even stealing food from bears.
Pufferfish:
cute and deadly

As amusing as these tiny inflatable fish can be, the pufferfish are in fact the second most poisonous vertebrate on the planet. The neurotoxin is found primarily in the ovaries and liver of the fish and it is lethal to humans if they eat, get bitten, or in some rare cases, even touch the pufferfish. So if you are diving and see one of these guys, all swollen up like a little spiky ball, know you should swim the other way.
Bottlenose Dolphin:
cute and deadly

Dolphins are probably the last thing you would expect to find on a list like this and yet here they are. It is true that dolphins are extremely smart mammals and that they have been known to save drowning people and aid stranded boats, but they have a dark side as well. For many years now, marine biologists notice many dead baby dolphins washing up ashore, 'mangled in unexpected ways.' It has been confirmed that dolphins will attack each other and sometimes even humans if they are in a certain state of mind. Let's not forget, these creatures are meat eaters, they hunt and kill fish with their strong teeth and there have even been reports of dolphins being sexually aggressive toward humans.
Blue-ringed octopus:
cute and deadly
The blue-ringed octopus is  only 12 to 20 cm (5 to 8 in) long but don't let its size fool you, its venom is powerful enough to outright kill you. No blue-ringed octopus antidote is available yet, making it one of the deadliest reef inhabitants in the ocean. The blue rings live in tidal regions ranging from Australia to Japan, and are frequently encountered by people in tide pools. The venom in these octopuses has the same kind of neurotoxin found in pufferfish and some poison dart frogs, a poison that is 1200 times more toxic than cyanide.
Honey Badgers:
cute and deadly

Don't let the name fool you, there are very few sweet things about this furry little ball of claws and teeth. They are a primarily carnivorous species and have few natural predators due to their thick skin and ferocious defensive abilities. The dense skin of the average honey badger can protect it from snake bites, insect stings and even machetes and arrows. And if we mention snakes, an animal well known for being deadly, then you should know that honey badgers are one of few creatures that actually hunt and eat snakes. If they don't find something as small as a snake to eat, they are also known to take down much larger animals like deer and zebras. They devour all parts of their prey, including skin, hair, feathers, flesh and bones. If all of this doesn't make you fear this "cute" little thing, I don't know what will. 
Slow Loris:
cute and deadly
Dear lord just look at those eyes! How can anything this slow and sweet be dangerous? Well you might be shocked to hear, but the slow loris is one of the only poisonous mammals in the world. The poison comes out of glands on the lorises elbows which they then lick and the saliva in their mouth makes the oily toxin active. The other scary thing about these guys is that not only is their bite poisonous, and can also transfer rabies, but they also lick themselves to make their whole body poisonous. The toxin can cause death by anaphylactic shock and is not something to be taken lightly, the slow loris really is one cute little guy you don't want to fool around with. 
 Jack B.

Posted by: jyoti ranpura